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Is Amazon bad for

the ENVIRONMENT?
BUSINESS?
WORKERS?
TAXPAYERS?
the COMMUNITY?
RESIDENTS?
Amazon is bad for 
the environment?
business?
workers?
taxpayers?
the community?
residents?
amazonupdates.org

Don't Let Jeff Bezos Turn North Andover into North Amazon!

Complaints against Amazon’s harmful practices are well documented. With its giant complex in North Andover, Amazon could increase pollution,1 traffic,2 and unlawful employment practices3 in our town.

Did you know? Amazon’s complex received $27 million in corporate welfare and tax breaks not from the state, not from D.C., but directly from the pockets of North Andover taxpayers. North Andover households are now each essentially paying an average of $2,400 to Amazon, just so Amazon might bring to N. Andover what has generated complaints about pollution,1 traffic,2 safety violations,3 and potential decrease of residential property values4 in other communities. While Jeff Bezos adds to his billions (almost trillions) with our hard-earned tax dollars, is North Andover on its way to becoming Amazon’s next victim? 

Join local efforts to hold Amazon accountable for how it treats the community, the environment, and workers.

Together, we should ensure Amazon plays by the rules, protects our property values, and builds their complex in an ethical way, using developers and contractors who will ensure safety, quality wages and allow workers a voice on the job.

Right now, our elected officials need to demand a comprehensive, responsible employer agreement from Amazon, before it’s too late.

Join local efforts to hold Amazon accountable.

Amazon’s Pollution, Traffic, and Unlawful Practices are not Prime for North Andover or for the Merrimack Valley.

AMAZON IS

See what has been reported about Amazon in other communities, and judge for yourself.

Bad for the Environment?

Amazon’s Environmental Record May Be As Bad As Its Work Culture

Amazon's quasi-dystopian workplace culture is far from its only moral failure in a corporate world that increasingly expects big companies to do the right thing. Its environmental record is badly smudged. Unlike some of its biggest rivals, the e-commerce giant refuses to release information about energy consumption at its data centers. Only last November did it start using renewable energy to power some of these electricity-guzzling facilities. In addition, the company offers to recycle customers’ old devices, but the program is far from comprehensive.

Why Amazon’s new streamlined packaging is jamming up recycling centers

Over the past year, Amazon has reduced the portion of shipments it packs in its cardboard boxes in favor of lightweight plastic mailers, which enable the retailing giant to squeeze more packages in delivery trucks and planes. But environmental activists and waste experts say the new plastic sacks, which aren’t recyclable in curbside recycling bins, are having a negative effect.

Amazon under fire for new packaging that cannot be recycled

Amazon has been criticised by environmental groups and customers after introducing a range of plastic packaging that cannot be recycled in the UK. While supermarkets and other retailers have been reducing their use of single use plastics, the world’s biggest online retailer has started sending small items in plastic envelopes, seemingly to allow more parcels to be loaded on to each delivery truck.

Amazon gets an ‘F’ from the Carbon Disclosure Project

Many global corporate giants have been sharing their data on carbon emissions with CDP, a nonprofit that gathers that information on behalf of big institutional investors worried about how their assets will fare in a warming world. But Amazon.com, unlike many of its rivals, keeps those cards close to the chest. CDP, formerly known as the Carbon Disclosure Project, queries companies about carbon emissions and other data every year to build what it says is the most detailed collection of self-reported environmental information anywhere.

The Hidden Environmental Cost of Amazon Prime’s Free, Fast Shipping

Amazon has changed the way Americans shop. This year, the e-commerce giant said its annual Prime Day sale was “the biggest shopping event in Amazon history.” During the 36-hour event, people bought over 100 million products, crashed the website, and signed up for more Prime memberships than ever before. The behavior is indicative of the buying culture Amazon created. The company's ease, speed, and savings — underscored by killer perks like free, expedited shipping and simple returns — has encouraged more people to shop online, more often.

Amazon’s 1-day shipping is convenient — and terrible for the environment

Since 2005, Amazon has attracted hundreds of millions of customers to its Prime membership program by promising one thing — free and fast shipping, with products arriving within 48 hours or less. There had been numerous caveats to Amazon’s free two-day shipping program: For orders with some small items, Prime has required customers to spend a minimum of $25 before they qualify for free shipping, and orders, in general, can take longer than two days to reach a customer.

Amazon’s carbon footprint goes beyond shipping millions of Prime packages

On September 20, hundreds of Amazon workers plan to walk out of the company's Seattle headquarters. The organized action is in part to support the worldwide climate strike set to take place that day, but is just as much an effort to get the attention of Amazon's leadership, which has been largely silent on the company's impact on our environment.

Greenpeace blasts Amazon over poor environmental practices

Greenpeace has made a tradition out of raking companies over the coals when their environmental practices fall short of its standards, and that's truer than ever in the activist group's latest electronics report card. The organization didn't list any major company whose environmental stances (including renewable energy, sustainable products and toxin-free materials) were good enough to merit an "A" grade, and four companies earned an unflattering "F" -- including internet giant Amazon. According to Greenpeace, Jeff Bezos' brainchild falls well short on most marks.

Amazon Employees Will Walk Out Over the Company's Climate Change Inaction

OVER THE PAST year, tech workers across the country have walked out to protest a wide range of issues. Google employees objected to the handling of sexual harassment claims. Riot Games workers demonstrated against forced arbitration. And WayFair staff left their desks after learning that the retailer profited from migrant detention centers run by US Immigrations and Customs Enforcement. Now it's Amazon's turn.

Bad for Business?

How Amazon Wins: By Steamrolling Rivals and Partners

Jeff Bezos built Amazon.com Inc. from his garage with an underdog’s ambition to take on the establishment. He imbued staff with an obsession to grow fast by grabbing customers using the biggest selection and lowest prices. Today, he has more than 1.1 million employees and a market valuation around $1.6 trillion. But Amazon never really grew up. Mr. Bezos still runs it with the drive of a startup trying to survive.

New York City business owners haunted by Amazon loss amid pandemic

Two years after Amazon pulled out from a proposal to build a massive headquarters along the Queens waterfront, the site is a vacant eyesore — and, to many locals, the squandered economic opportunity is even more painful amid the coronavirus pandemic. “The site just sits there empty. It’s terrible,” said Donna Drimer, owner of the Matted LIC art gallery and gift store. “We’re in the middle of a pandemic. People say, ‘If we only had Amazon.’ We got nothing.”

California Is Examining Amazon’s Business Practices

California investigators are examining Amazon.com Inc.’s business practices as part of an inquiry into the tech giant, according to people familiar with the matter. The state’s review focuses at least in part on how Amazon treats sellers in its online marketplace, these people said. That includes Amazon’s practices for selling its own products in competition with third-party sellers, one of the people said. Neither Amazon nor California has disclosed an antitrust investigation.

Amazon's business practices under fire in California

California investigators are examining Amazon.com Inc.’s AMZN -0.51% business practices as part of an inquiry into the tech giant, according to people familiar with the matter. The state’s review focuses at least in part on how Amazon treats sellers in its online marketplace, these people said. That includes Amazon’s practices for selling its own products in competition with third-party sellers, one of the people said. Neither Amazon nor California has disclosed an antitrust investigation.

How Amazon’s Business Practices Harm American Consumers: Why Amazon Needs a Competitor and Why Walmart Ain’t It

$1,950,000. That’s what our company paid Amazon last year. We sell plush and construction toys on Amazon. Well, technically, we sell toys on our website, on eBay, on Walmart.com, to brick-and-mortar stores, and we sell on Amazon. But, really, we only sell on Amazon. In 2018, we had about $4,000,000 in sales but Amazon.com accounted for over 98% of that.

Amazon's business practices, handling of third-party sellers reportedly under review by California, Washington

NEW YORK — State officials in California and Washington are reviewing Amazon's business practices to determine whether the company is violating any laws with respect to the independent merchants that sell goods on its site, according to published reports.

Senator asks DOJ to investigate Amazon’s ‘predatory’ practices

A US senator is calling on the Justice Department to open a criminal probe of Amazon’s “predatory data practices.” Sen. Josh Hawley (R-MO.), who has long been critical of Silicon Valley’s biggest companies and their privacy practices, expressed concern Tuesday about a Monday report that Amazon collects data about third-party products it sells on its website in order to create its own Amazon branded copies.

Amazon is reportedly facing a new antitrust investigation into its online marketplace led by the FTC and attorneys general in New York and California

State attorneys general from New York and California have teamed up with the Federal Trade Commission to investigate Amazon's online marketplace, Bloomberg reported Monday. The agencies plan to begin interviewing witnesses in the coming weeks, according Bloomberg.

Amazon’s Jeff Bezos Says He ‘Can’t Guarantee’ Company Doesn’t Use Data of Independent Sellers

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos told a congressional antitrust hearing on Wednesday that he was unsure if his company had used the data of third-party sellers to inform Amazon’s business decisions, in violation of its own policies. Bezos made the admission during questioning by Representative Pramila Jayapal (D., Wash.), whose district in Seattle is home to Amazon headquarters. Amazon has faced accusations from former employees that the company has used data from third-party sellers to market and manufacture its own products

Bad for Workers?

Amazon Is Paying Employees to Quit Right Before Critical Union Vote

An annual program in which Amazon offers to pay workers at least $1,000 to quit their jobs could threaten a unionization drive in Bessemer, Alabama. On Sunday, there were concerns on Twitter that the drive was specifically targeted at the Bessemer warehouse, but Amazon runs this program nationally and has for several years.

Amazon intensifies 'severe' effort to discourage first-ever US warehouse union

A push to unionize workers at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama is running into tough opposition as the retail giant, whose profits have boomed during the coronavirus pandemic despite concerns over worker safety, has launched an aggressive anti-union drive. If workers at the BHM1 warehouse in Bessemer, near Birmingham, succeed in their efforts they would form the first union at an Amazon warehouse in the US.

Court filings show how Amazon Web Services is using Section 230 as a legal sword against Parler

The social media platform Parler marketed itself as a place where Americans could “speak freely” and avoid the fear of being “deplatformed.” Its investors included conservative donor Rebekah Mercer, who described Parler as “a beacon to all who value their liberty.” But Parler was never any sort of wholly independent island of absolutely free speech. Before Parler’s August 2018 launch, according to court documents, its leaders signed the nascent site up for Amazon’s cloud-based web hosting services

It takes eight weeks for an Amazon warehouse worker to earn what Jeff Bezos makes in a second, says union

A union has claimed that it takes an Amazon warehouse worker over eight weeks, or 293 hours, to earn what Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in a single second, a union has said. The Trades Union Congress (TUC) analysed the earnings of the world’s wealthiest man and found that the amount of time it takes for an Amazon warehouse worker to earn what Mr Bezos earns in a second increased from more than five weeks last year to eight weeks this year.

Amazon to face first U.S. unionization vote in seven years next month

Amazon will face its first union vote on U.S. soil in seven years on Feb. 8, when ballots will be mailed to warehouse workers in Bessemer, Alabama, for an election that could emerge as a major labor battle at one of the country's largest employers. A National Labor Relations Board hearing officer ruled Friday that roughly 6,000 workers at the facility will have seven weeks to cast their ballots to be represented by the Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union. The decision granted the union's request to hold the balloting entirely by mail, over the objections of Amazon, which wanted in-person voting.

6,000 Amazon warehouse workers will hold union vote in Alabama on Feb. 8

Amazon warehouse workers at an Alabama warehouse can begin voting by mail in early February on whether to form a union, a National Labor Relations Board hearing officer ruled Friday. The ruling kicks off what will be a closely watched union vote at one of the nation’s largest employers. Unions have a stronger foothold among some of Amazon’s European workforce, but the company has largely manage to thwart organizing efforts in the U.S.

From being targeted for robbery to confrontational customers, 4 Amazon delivery drivers talk about what scares them during peak season

Dog bites, twisted ankles, and dealing with irritable customers are all just part of the job as an Amazon delivery driver. Many employees deliver in rural areas and have to navigate twisty, gravel, or dirt roads. Others deliver multiple 50-pound packages to the same five-story walk-up apartment building every day.

It takes eight weeks for an Amazon warehouse worker to earn what Jeff Bezos makes in a second, says union

A union has claimed that it takes an Amazon warehouse worker over eight weeks, or 293 hours, to earn what Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in a single second, a union has said. The Trades Union Congress (TUC) analysed the earnings of the world’s wealthiest man and found that the amount of time it takes for an Amazon warehouse worker to earn what Mr Bezos earns in a second increased from more than five weeks last year to eight weeks this year.

Federal Labor Agency Investigation Finds Amazon Illegally Fired Protesting Warehouse Worker

A National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) investigation has found merit to a complaint that alleged Amazon illegally retaliated against a warehouse worker in New York City for his role in organizing Amazon employees in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, a spokesperson for the NLRB has confirmed.

US investigation finds Amazon illegally fired warehouse worker

A National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) investigation has found merit to a complaint that said Amazon illegally discharged a protesting warehouse worker in New York City, according to an NLRB spokesperson. Gerald Bryson, an Amazon associate, was helping to lead a protest outside a company warehouse in Staten Island, New York on 6 April while off the job, when he got into a dispute with another worker, according to Bryson’s attorney Frank Kearl.

Amazon Has Turned a Middle-Class Warehouse Career Into a McJob

Amazon.com Inc. job ads are everywhere. Plastered on city buses, displayed on career web sites, slotted between songs on classic rock stations. They promise a quick start, $15 an hour and health insurance. In recent weeks, America’s second-largest employer has rolled out videos featuring happy package handlers wearing masks, a pandemic-era twist on its annual holiday season hiring spree.

Bad for Taxpayers?

Jeff Bezos To Step Down As Amazon's CEO

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos will step down as the company's chief executive officer this summer, after more than a quarter-century at the helm of the retail, logistics and tech powerhouse. Bezos will become Amazon's executive chairman and remain its biggest shareholder, the company said on Tuesday. He will hand over the CEO reins to Andy Jassy, the head of Amazon's cash-cow cloud computing division.

Why Amazon paid no 2018 US federal income tax

In 2018, Amazon paid $0 in U.S. federal income tax on more than $11 billion in profits before taxes. It also received a $129 million tax rebate from the federal government. Amazon’s low tax bill mainly stemmed from the Republican tax cuts of 2017, carryforward losses from years when the company was not profitable, tax credits for massive investments in R&D and stock-based employee compensation.

Amazon paid a 1.2% tax rate on $13,285,000,000 in profit for 2019

Last year, Yahoo Finance reported that Amazon (AMZN) paid a shockingly low amount in federal income taxes in 2018 on more than $11 billion in profits: $0. But this year, while the company says it has paid “billions” in taxes for the year 2019, in reality it only paid $162 million in federal income tax — an effective tax rate of 1.2% on over $13 billion in profits.

This article is more than 8 months old New study deems Amazon worst for 'aggressive' tax avoidance

The big six US tech firms have been accused of “aggressively avoiding” $100bn (£75bn) of global tax over the past decade. Amazon, Facebook, Google, Netflix, Apple and Microsoft have been named in a report by tax transparency campaign group Fair Tax Mark as avoiding tax by shifting revenue and profits through tax havens or low-tax countries, and for also delaying the payment of taxes they do incur.

Amazon paid no federal taxes on $11.2 billion in profits last year

Amazon, the e-commerce giant helmed by the world’s richest man, paid no federal taxes on profit of $11.2 billion last year, according to an analysis of the company’s corporate filings by the Institute for Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP), a progressive think tank. Thanks to a variety of tax credits and a significant tax break available on pay handed out in the form of company stock, Amazon actually received a federal tax rebate of $129 million last year, giving it an effective federal tax rate of roughly -1 percent.

Why Amazon Pays No Corporate Taxes

Amazon’s recent decision to pull HQ2 out of New York City has reignited an older debate about why the company pays “no taxes.” One graphic, for example, produced by data journalist Mona Chalabi and subsequently reshared by House member Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez among many others, shows two superimposed graphs comparing Amazon’s quickly growing profit next to its negligible taxes over the last nine years.

Despite record profits, Amazon didn't pay any federal income tax in 2017 or 2018. Here's why

New York (CNN Business)Amazon hasn't paid any taxes to the US government in the past two years. Actually, Amazon received hundreds of millions of dollars in federal tax credits in 2017 and 2018. That might seem nuts, considering Amazon is the third-most valuable company in the world and earned a record $10 billion last year. But critics of Amazon's tax bill aren't accusing Amazon of doing anything improper.

Amazon will pay $0 in taxes on $11,200,000,000 in profit for 2018

While some people have received some surprise tax bills when filing their returns, corporations continue to avoid paying tax — thanks to a cocktail of tax credits, loopholes, and exemptions. According to a report from the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP), Amazon (AMZN) will pay nothing in federal income taxes for the second year in a row.

Bad for Community?

Amazon spends $200 million for S.F. site once slated for housing

Seattle e-commerce giant Amazon paid $200 million to buy a San Francisco site where it plans to build a new delivery station, expanding its massive shipping infrastructure in an urban center. The property’s former owner had envisioned offices and housing on the site a few blocks from the city’s Caltrain station.

Amazon doubles Q2 income, more warehouse expansion planned this year

The company reported $5.2 billion in Q2 income, a quarter that is typically viewed as the lightest period for its retail business.

The economy is in record decline, but not for Amazon and other tech giants

OAKLAND, Calif. — A day after lawmakers grilled the chief executives of the biggest tech companies about their size and power, Amazon, Apple, Alphabet and Facebook reported surprisingly healthy quarterly financial results, defying one of the worst economic downturns on record. Even though the companies felt some sting from the spending slowdown, they demonstrated, as critics have argued, that they are operating on a different playing field from the rest of the economy.

Less Than One-Quarter of Customers Trust Amazon the Most to Safely Deliver Packages

WASHINGTON, July 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a new survey report from Clutch, a B2B ratings and reviews platform, only 22% of people trust Amazon to safely deliver their packages compared to four other shipping carriers: UPS, United States Postal Service (USPS), FedEx, and DHL. The past seven months have seen an increase in online shopping with individuals spending more time at home and staying away from in-person shopping. There has also been a consequent rise in package theft.

AMAZON WARNS EARPHONES COULD OVERHEAT

Amazon has warned that its wireless headphones may be at risk of overheating. The Echo Buds, wireless in-ears that have the company’s voice assistant Alexa built into them, have had their temperature increase while in the charging case. Amazon has since released a software update to address the issue, having sent an email to customers warning them of the situation. The past seven months have seen an increase in online shopping with individuals spending more time at home and staying away from in-person shopping. There has also been a consequent rise in package theft.

Protesters Set Up 'Guillotine' In Front of Jeff Bezos's House

Demonstrators in Washington, D.C., showed up in front of Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos’s house on Sunday, with a mock guillotine and a sign that read “support our poor communities not our wealthy men.” In an announcement about the march, the activists called for Amazon to be abolished.

Amazon Is Jeff Bezos

A quarter-century ago, Jeff Bezos was a finance nerd with a tiny bookselling website. You know what happened next. Bezos’s career arc tracks the shift of technology from a relatively fringe industry into a central force in the world. And that’s exactly why Bezos and the chief executives of three other American tech stars will be testifying this week at a congressional panel investigating possible abuses of their power. The congressional hot seat shows how far the industry has come.

Amazon CEO Bezos will tell antitrust committee that big isn't bad

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos will tell the House Judiciary antitrust subcommittee Wednesday that his tech enterprise is a classic American company with an “obsessive customer focus” that employs a million people, according to prepared remarks released by the company. Bezos, the richest man in the world, will appear on Capitol Hill along with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Apple CEO Tim Cook, and the CEO of Google parent company Alphabet, Sundar Pichai.

Bad for Residents?

Amazon opposition, Grand Island group petitions Town Board to oppose project

GRAND ISLAND, N.Y. (WKBW) — About 100 people gathered on Grand Island Friday evening to oppose a plan to build an Amazon facility on Long Road, off I-190. From traffic concerns to environmental concerns, the Coalition for Responsible Economic Development for Grand Island (CRED4GI) has a petition asking the Grand Island Town Board to oppose the project. The group, which formed in July, said 1,300 people have signed the petition.

As Grand Island project stalls, massive Amazon center near Syracuse is built

A few miles north of Syracuse, the structural steel for one of the world's largest warehouses rises from the grounds of a former golf course. Officials in Onondaga County and the Town of Clay embraced the $350 million Amazon project, and the massive development faced no coordinated opposition. The five-story, nearly four million-square-foot complex won approval two months after it was introduced by the developer last fall and will have 1,000 workers when it opens in 2021.

Neighbors seek relief from Amazon construction noise

ARLINGTON, Va. — Amazon deliveries may be delayed for some folks because of the coronavirus, but construction of Amazon’s Virginia headquarters is moving right along, with piledriving work so loud it’s driving the stuck-at-home neighbors crazy.

Grand Island residents voice numerous concerns about Amazon at town hall meeting

The Grand Island Town Board spoke with local residents Monday night about the proposed 3.8 million-square-foot Amazon warehouse, also known as Project Olive. They were met by a majority of speakers and protestors who opposed the project and are asking for multiple public hearings before any final decisions are made.

‘Amazon is not taking care of us’: Warehouse workers say they’re struggling to get paid despite sick leave policy

Sharlene wanted to continue reporting to her job at Amazon. She needed the money to pay her bills and support her family. But after a trip to the emergency room, Sharlene, who didn’t want her full name used out of fear of retribution from her employer, was instructed to self-quarantine.

'We Were Proven Right,' Says AOC After Amazon Expands in New York Without Taking Billions in Public Cash

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez suggested the Trump administration "focus more on cutting public assistance to billionaires instead of poor families" after news broke Friday that Amazon was expanding its presence in New York City without the state giving the company billions in tax incentives.

As 'Corporate Bribery' Lands Amazon HQ2 in Queens, Ocasio-Cortez Says 'Outrage' Best Describes Community Response

The idea that Amazon "will receive hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks at a time when our subway is crumbling and our communities need more investment, not less, is extremely concerning to residents here."

Amazon project on Grand Island comes under heavy fire

The proposed Amazon megaproject on Grand Island came under withering criticism during Monday’s Town Board meeting from residents who fear a devastating effect on the town’s quality of life. Speakers said the 3.8 million-square-foot facility is far too big for the island, would generate too much traffic.

Articles for Safety

California Targets Amazon Over Virus Worker Safety Protocols

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Monday he’s escalating efforts to force Amazon.com Inc. to cooperate with an ongoing probe of worker safety conditions during the coronavirus pandemic. Becerra said Amazon hasn’t fully complied with his office’s demand for information from four months ago and that California is now asking a judge to order cooperation with the state’s investigation into the company’s policies and protocols.

Consumer Groups Issue Warning: Holiday Shoppers Beware Of Dangerous And Fake Products Sold On Amazon

Today American Family Voices, Public Citizen and Athena issued a warning to Americans: Beware of the potentially dangerous and fake products sold on Amazon during this holiday season. Numerous press and investigative reports document Amazon's apparent pattern of selling banned, unsafe, counterfeit or mislabeled products, including some under its own AmazonBasics brand and with the "Amazon's Choice" label.

Amazon.com, eBay and Wish found selling dangerous recalled products

A Which? investigation has found Amazon.com, eBay and Wish all selling dangerous products that have been recalled Europe-wide. Our research has revealed time and again that unsafe products slip through the checks put in place by online marketplaces. When Which? reports listings of dangerous products to online shopping sites, they’re usually swiftly removed – but we wanted to find out if regular shoppers have the same experience, so we reported the listings posing as a consumer.

Less Than One-Quarter of Customers Trust Amazon the Most to Safely Deliver Packages

WASHINGTON, July 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- According to a new survey report from Clutch, a B2B ratings and reviews platform, only 22% of people trust Amazon to safely deliver their packages compared to four other shipping carriers: UPS, United States Postal Service (USPS), FedEx, and DHL. The past seven months have seen an increase in online shopping with individuals spending more time at home and staying away from in-person shopping. There has also been a consequent rise in package theft.

Virus, holidays pose safety challenges for shipping, distribution sectors

Companies seeing an increase in online holiday shopping and shipping face myriad workplace safety challenges, from keeping up with evolving health and safety standards to hiring and training seasonal workers in environments that have seen upticks in injuries in recent years, experts say.

Workers Risking the COVID-19 Outbreak at Amazon’s Troutdale Warehouse Signed a Strict Confidentiality Agreement

On June 10, the Oregon Health Authority announced a COVID-19 outbreak at Amazon's Troutdale warehouse that has now lasted 25 weeks and infected 97 people with the virus, making it one of the largest workplace outbreaks in Oregon. It's understandable why a reporter might want to reach out to some of the 4,500 employees at the warehouse to discuss working conditions at Amazon.

Amazon workers, community members protest outside Jeff Bezos' NYC home for better COVID-19 protections

Amazon workers and community members vying for stricter workplace safety standards during the COVID-19 pandemic took their fight to Jeff Bezos' Manhattan home Wednesday. Protesters gathered outside the Amazon chief executive's multimillion-dollar Fifth Avenue residence to call attention to Bezos and other CEOs who they claim have made billions during the global health crisis while putting workers' lives at risk.

Amazon delves deeper into voice recognition, call-center work as COVID-19 drives cloud

Amazon.com Inc on Tuesday announced voice recognition as part of a suite of call-center services for businesses, as the company sees growing demand for its cloud tools during the coronavirus pandemic. Speaking at the company’s annual re:Invent conference, executive Andy Jassy announced Amazon Connect Voice ID, which uses machine learning software to authenticate customers who dial into call centers.

Safety Concerns for the Community

Amazon workers in France, Italy, Spain & Poland strike over labour conditions during COVID-19 pandemic

In France, Italy, Spain and Poland, workers say they have little choice but to keep working despite the risk of coronavirus infection. Amazon faces a rash of strikes and protests at sites across Europe as warehouse workers lash out over what they say are gruelling labor conditions, minimal protection and the risk of infection after several employees tested positive for coronavirus...“People are afraid,” said Agnieszka Mróz, a packer in Amazon’s warehouse in Poznań in western Poland and an activist at Inicjatywa Pracownicza (the Workers' Initiative), a trade union. “This company is using our health to make a big fortune."

Amazon is using AI-equipped cameras in delivery vans and some drivers are concerned about privacy

Amazon drivers at some U.S. facilities will soon have an extra set of eyes watching them when they hit the road to make their daily deliveries. The company recently began testing AI-equipped cameras in vehicles to monitor contracted delivery drivers while they’re on the job, with the aim of improving safety.

Amazon considering relocating some Seattle employees outside the city

Amazon is taking steps to allow employees at its Seattle-based headquarters the option to work outside the city, weeks after a new local employer tax was passed and the coronavirus pandemic impacts corporate office plans. The company sent out a message to employees in Seattle on Thursday, asking which communities near the city they would prefer. Among the ideas floated for new, smaller office workplace locations included Redmond, where Microsoft's corporate headquarters are located, Tacoma, Renton, and Bothell/Woodinville.

Amazon considers moving employees out of Seattle amid COVID-19, violence

Amazon is taking steps to allow employees to work outside of the city, which has been plagued in recent months by both coronavirus and Antifa violence. On Thursday the company sent a message to their employees in the city floating the possibility of other nearby municipalities they might be comfortable living in, Bloomberg reported.

Lifeline or life risk: Working in an Amazon warehouse

When the California state college system shut down its campuses and moved classes online due to the coronavirus in March, rising junior Chad Ellis returned home to Charlotte, where he expected to finish his classes and hang out with friends and family. Then, mega e-tailer Amazon announced plans to fill 100,000 positions across the U.S at fulfillment and distribution centers to handle the surge of online orders.

Workers Turn Into Sleuths to Track Sicknesses Where Employers Keep Covid Data Secret

Jana Jumpp spends eight hours a day updating a spreadsheet — not for work, but a recent hobby: figuring out how many of Amazon’s 400,000 warehouse workers have fallen sick with the coronavirus. Amazon won’t give a number, so Jumpp tracks it on her own and shares what she finds with others. She relies on Amazon employees at more than 250 facilities who call, text or send her Facebook messages with possible cases. She asks for proof, like messages or voicemails from Amazon, and tries to make sure she doesn’t count the same case twice.

Amazon workers interviewed as part of New York Attorney General's probe into company's coronavirus response

The New York Attorney General Letitia James' office has interviewed workers from several New York City Amazon facilities as part of a probe into the company's response to coronavirus, James' office told CNN. Some Amazon (AMZN) warehouse workers have claimed the company did not do enough to safeguard them from the virus. The Attorney General's office talked to employees about allegations concerning personal protective equipment and other safeguards related to Covid-19, as well as allegations of retaliation in the firing of an Amazon employee based out of Staten Island, the office said.

Union: We cannot allow Amazon to set health and safety standards

Amazon warehouse workers in New York are getting help from unions in their fight for better pandemic working conditions. The Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union is joining with European unions that have been battling Amazon over warehouse conditions there. These unions are joining lawmakers including Rep. Pramila Jayapal in asking a court for an injunction.

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Unions rally for more jobs, better working conditions at Amazon complex being built in North Andover

Labor groups and local politicians held a rally Monday at the site of an enormous distribution center Amazon is building in North Andover, urging the e-commerce giant to improve worker safety and use more union labor to build and staff the project. The Merrimack Valley Construction and Building Trades Council has launched a broad campaign targeting the development, which would convert the old Western Electric/Lucent Technologies plant on Osgood Street into a 3.8-million-square-foot shipping hub. It’s focused on winning construction jobs now, but also wants to highlight environmental concerns, COVID-19 outbreaks, and other safety issues at similar Amazon facilities nationwide as a way to push the company to promise better working conditions for the roughly 1,500 people the center will employ.

Where city leaders once saw a potential Olympic stadium, Amazon eyes a massive distribution center

It was once pitched as the centerpiece of Boston’s bid for the 2024 Summer Olympics, then as a mini-city of its own, with millions of square feet of condominium and office towers. Now, Widett Circle could instead become home to a giant Amazon distribution center. The new owners of Widett — just south of downtown between South Boston and the Southeast Expressway ― are in serious talks with the e-commerce giant about building a shipping hub on the roughly 20-acre site, according to several people familiar with the discussions. A deal has not been finalized, and other potential tenants are still in the mix. But Amazon, eager to build its first major distribution center in the city, is considered a strong contender.

Boston-area labor unions assail Amazon amid tech giant’s Mass. exploitation

Hundreds gathered Monday at the future site of the Amazon.com Inc. distribution center in North Andover, with labor leaders and politicians blasting the company for what they called substandard wages and poor benefits. The rally marked the latest step in months-long campaigns organized by local unions that have featured television and other advertisements as well as city council resolutions in Boston, Cambridge and elsewhere calling out the company for its labor practices. The AFL-CIO's local chapter and Teamsters Local 25 are among the groups that have been critical of Amazon (Nasdaq: AMZN), which is opening up warehouses, delivery sites and other facilities across Greater Boston.

Unions Rally Over Working Conditions At North Andover Amazon Site

Local unions and elected officials were among those protesting Monday afternoon at the future site of a large Amazon distribution facility. The protesters called for better working conditions for both the construction phase and the future operation of the facility, as part of the "Amazon Updates" campaign launched in October by the Merrimack Valley Construction and Building Trades Council. Chris Brennan, president of the Merrimack Valley Building Trades Council, said the unions are calling for "careers, not jobs." That means higher wages as well as benefits including healthcare and retirement — not just for Amazon's direct employees, but also for contractors like those constructing the facility.

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“The last phone call I got back from a public relations guy from Amazon was last September, right after Labor Day. Crickets since then.” — Frank Callahan, president of the Massachusetts Building Trades Council, at a union rally Monday where hundreds gathered at the future site of the Amazon.com Inc. distribution center in North Andover.

'We've had enough': Labor unions protest outside North Andover Amazon site

“We demand area standards, and we will not sit idle when this bad actor comes to North Andover — Amazon,” Tom Mari of the Teamsters Local 25 said over cheers and horns from passing cars along Route 125. The nationwide war between labor and Amazon saw battle in the Merrimack Valley’s back yard Monday afternoon, as crowds of union workers and their supporters gathered in front of the future Amazon distribution center in North Andover to protest what they say are labor abuses by the e-commerce behemoth.

Protesters gather outside Amazon site in North Andover

Photos of protesters gathered outside Amazon site in North Andover.

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There is no current proposal for Amazon to expand into Lowell, though some may have gotten that impression upon seeing a motion by Councilor John Drinkwater that was discussed at Tuesday’s City Council meeting. In his motion, Drinkwater requested that the council “adopt a resolution urging community engagement and fair employment standards for any expansion of Amazon involving the City Of Lowell.” He prefaced his remarks by acknowledging that no such proposal exists in the city at this time. “But I really think there probably isn’t anywhere around, or at least here in eastern Massachusetts, where the expansion of Amazon isn’t at least a distinct possibility,” Drinkwater said. “Just in the last year, Amazon nationwide added 100 million square feet of warehouse space, and they are buying up warehouses all over the place and throughout the communities here in the Merrimack Valley and eastern Massachusetts.”

Amazon backlash

Local unions and elected officials were among those protesting Monday afternoon at the future site of a large Amazon distribution facility in North Andover. The protesters called for better working conditions for both the construction phase and the future operation of the facility, as part of the "Amazon Updates" campaign launched in October by the Merrimack Valley Construction and Building Trades Council. Amazon said it already offers what the 150 protesters were calling for.

Hundreds rally in North Andover against Amazon's treatment of community, workers

Hundreds of union members, locals and political leaders united Monday to protest an Amazon distribution facility in North Andover, just as many of them have at similar developments across Massachusetts. Their anger has mounted as Amazon plans a 5-story, 3.6 million square foot distribution center at 1600 Osgood St. Opponents share concerns that Amazon’s presence will sink the community’s workforce and atmosphere. Records show that as part of an agreement with town officials, Amazon will receive a $27 million tax break. “Amazon needs to be held accountable for how it treats our community, the environment and workers,” said Chris Brennan, president of the Merrimack Valley Construction and Building Trades Council. “We want to make sure that Amazon’s presence here benefits the community.”